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Function Composition and the Pipe Operator in C++23 – With std::expected

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In this blog post, we’ll show how to implement a custom pipe operator and apply it to a data processing example. Thanks to C++23 and std::expectedwe can write a rather efficient framework that easily handles unexpected outcomes. This is a collaborative guest post by prof. Bogusław Cyganek: Prof. Cyganek is a researcher and lecturer at the Department of Electronics, AGH University of Science and Technology in Cracow, Poland.

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std::expected - Monadic Extensions

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std::expected from C++23 not only serves as an error-handling mechanism but also introduces functional programming paradigms into the language. In this blog post, we’ll have a look at functional/monadic extensions of std::expected, which allow us to chain operations elegantly, handling errors at the same time. The techniques are very similar to std::optional extensions - see How to Use Monadic Operations for `std::optional` in C++23 - C++ Stories.

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Understand internals of std::expected

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In the article about std::expected, I introduced the type and showed some basic examples, and in this text, you’ll learn how it is implemented. A simple idea with struct   In short, std::expected should contain two data members: the actual expected value and the unexpected error object. So, in theory, we could use a simple structure:

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Using std::expected from C++23

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In this article, we’ll go through a new vocabulary type introduced in C++23. std::expected is a type specifically designed to return results from a function, along with the extra error information. Motivation   Imagine you’re expecting a certain result from a function, but oops… things don’t always go as planned:

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Six Handy Operations for String Processing in C++20/23

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In this article, we’ll explore six practical string processing operations introduced in C++20 and C++23. These features represent an evolution in this crucial area, covering a spectrum of operations from searching and appending to creation and stream handling. Let’s start with a simple yet long-awaited feature… 1. contains(), C++23   Finally, after decades of standardization, we have a super easy way to check if there’s one string inside the other.

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Formatting Custom types with std::format from C++20

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std::format is a large and powerful addition in C++20 that allows us to format text into strings efficiently. It adds Python-style formatting with safety and ease of use. This article will show you how to implement custom formatters that fit into this new std::format architecture. Updated in Nov 2023: reflect the constness of the format() function, clarified in LWG issue 3636.

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C++20, Spans, Threads and Fun

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In this post, we’ll have fun using C++20’s spans to process data on multiple threads. What’s more, we’ll be equipped with the latest concurrency features from C++20. This text was motivated by the following comment under my recent article on std::span: But why does this article… not show the major use case?

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How to use std::span from C++20

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In this article, we’ll look at std::span which is more generic than string_view and can help work with arbitrary contiguous collections. A Motivating Example   Here’s an example that illustrates the primary use case for std::span: In traditional C (or low-level C++), you’d pass an array to a function using a pointer and a size like this:

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