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See My New Book: C++ Initialization Story

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I’m happy to announce that my new book on C++ Initialization is published! Have a look at the background story and how to get it. Updates: Go to the latest updates from 18th Nov here, 30 new pages added! Note: Initially, the book was called “Data Member Initialization in Modern C++”, but in September 2022, I updated it heavily and changed the title.

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Summary of Non-Regular Data Members in C++

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If you have a class with a regular data member like an integer or string, you’ll get all special member functions out of the box. But how about different types? In this article, we’ll look at other categories of members like unique_ptr, raw pointers, references, or const members. Introduction   In my book on “C++ Initialization” I recently wrote a chapter about so-called non-regular data members.

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Smaller C++20 Features - My Presentation

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In September and October, I had the pleasure of running two meetings about C++20 features for my local Cracow C++ User Group! Here are the slides and additional comments from the presentation. The Talk   Initially I did one presentation using my article on smaller C++ 20 features (20 Smaller yet Handy C++20 Features - C++ Stories).

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All Major C++17 Features You Should Know

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The ISO Committee accepted and published the C++17 Standard in December 2017. In this mega-long article, I’ve built (with your help!) a list of all major features of the new standard. Please have a look and see what we get! Language Features New auto rules for direct-list-initialization static_assert with no message typename in a template template parameter Removing trigraphs Nested namespace definition Attributes for namespaces and enumerators u8 character literals Allow constant evaluation for all non-type template arguments Fold Expressions Unary fold expressions and empty parameter packs Remove Deprecated Use of the register Keyword Remove Deprecated operator++(bool) Removing Deprecated Exception Specifications from C++17 Make exception specifications part of the type system Aggregate initialization of classes with base classes Lambda capture of *this Using attribute namespaces without repetition Dynamic memory allocation for over-aligned data __has_include in preprocessor conditionals Template argument deduction for class templates Non-type template parameters with auto type Guaranteed copy elision New specification for inheriting constructors (DR1941 et al) Direct-list-initialization of enumerations Stricter expression evaluation order constexpr lambda expressions Different begin and end types in range-based for [[fallthrough]] attribute [[nodiscard]] attribute [[maybe_unused]] attribute Ignore unknown attributes Pack expansions in using-declarations Structured Binding Declarations Hexadecimal floating-point literals init-statements for if and switch Inline variables DR: Matching of template template-arguments excludes compatible templates std::uncaught_exceptions() constexpr if-statements SFINAE Tag dispatching if constexpr Library Features Merged: The Library Fundamentals 1 TS (most parts) Removal of some deprecated types and functions, including std::auto_ptr, std::random_shuffle, and old function adaptors Merged: The Parallelism TS, a.

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20+ Ways to Init a String, Looking for Sanity

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C++ is famous… or infamous for its complex initialization syntax. In this article, I’ll show you around 20 ways to initialize simple std::string variables. Can we somehow make it easier to understand? Default values   Have a look: void foo() { std::string str0; std::string str1 {}; } We have two local variables (with automatic storage duration), str0 is default initialized, while str1 is value initialized.

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